MODULE 4: ADVANCED TOPICS

alternate presentation formats in the "digital know-how" online screencasting courseIn this module, you will learn about other presentation formats to consider for your online presentations.  Each format presented can be produced with screen recording software such as that which you learned to use in earlier modules.  However, in this module you’ll learn about other formats that will add variety to your presentations beyond the run-of-the-mill PowerPoint / Keynote format.  By studying examples — and in fact applying — different formats, you will be able to increase engagement and interest by your learners.

Also included in this module is the much-asked-for process for producing the, so-called Picture-in-Picture effect.  That’s the technique you’ve seen me use throughout this course.  The Picture-in-Picture effect will require a bit of practice in order to master, but once mastered, you will find an avenue that affords you a unique style that differentiates you uniquely from your peers.

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While PowerPoint presentations are some of the easiest (and common) formats for presenting your knowledge capital with learners, it isn't necessarily the most engaging. In this topic you'll learn some other formats you may want to consider.

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While PowerPoint presentations are some of the easiest (and common) formats for presenting your knowledge capital with learners, it isn't necessarily the most engaging. In this topic you'll learn some other formats you may want to consider.

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By far the most popular question I get is: how to produce the picture-in-picture effect in my video screencasts. This topic will kick-off a 4-part series that explains in exacting detail each and every step I go through to produce that effect. It's not hard; but there are a few "moving parts" to it. In this topic you'll learn about two of the three methods. Specifically, in this topic you'll learn about the webcam method (most common with middling engagement quality), and you'll also learn some of the challenges with using an external HD camera that's connected directly to your computer.

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The third method for getting picture-in-picture live action videos overlayed on top of your screencast presentations is to use the record-to-camera-then-import method. This is the approach I recommend since it has the least issues; but there are still some things to pay attention to during the recording process so that you're set up to succeed during the editing phase.

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After having captured the video that you want to include as an overlay to your screencast presentation, you must now pay attention to details for ensuring both media types are synchronized. In this topic you'll learn the unique challenges that sometimes come up when you're attempting to do this after having recorded your project using the Direct-Feed method.

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In this topic you'll learn about the steps to pay attention to when you synchronize the video you recorded from your camera with the screencast presentation you want to overlay it upon.

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In this topic you'll learn about the steps to pay attention to when you synchronize the video you recorded from your camera with the screencast presentation you want to overlay it upon.

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Timeline gaps are an inevitable byproduct of editing projects. When you delete a segment of clips in the timeline, a gap remains. While this may seem trivial, a common trap that new screencasters quickly discover is that filling this gap isn't always as simple as simply dragging clips from the right of the gap along the timeline.

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This is part 1 in a 3-part series about how to set up for screencasting a Skype video interview. In part 1, I'll focus on showing you how I set up the hardware, software and settings with 3 points of view: You (the interviewer), your subject (the interviewee), and a third angle that your audience will relate to.

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This is part 2 in this 3-part series about screencasting a Skype video interview. In this video, we follow up on the settings discussed in the previous video and then proceed with the interview itself -- and I show you how to record it with a screencast editor such as ScreenFlow or Camtasia.

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This is part 3 in the 3-part series about screencasting your Skype video interview with PIP. In this video, I'll show you the end-product of the raw recording; you'll also see some helpful tips for editing and enhancing your Skype video interview so you can present it to your audience with a little more polish.